THE TERMS OF AGENDA 2063, DON’T THEY BOTHER YOU?

In 2013, probably, wearied of the economic lag, political dependence, regional impoverishment that be-shadow the African continent, her leaders gathered to negotiate the essence and substance of their existence. The result of this gathering was a document whose final draft was published in 2015, known as Agenda 2063; the Africa we want.

Given the current life expectancy of an African (not greater than 70), those who prepared the document, may be, by 2063, too old to navigate continental leadership, if the living breath they still possess. It, as a result, became paramount that while we celebrate the literary embroidery of the seven (7) aspirations, we should equip young Africans with the skill set basic to realize the Africa of our dream. It is, therefore, in line with this that Emerging Leaders under training by the Centre for Social Awareness Advocacy and Ethics Inc. (CSAAE), have been groomed to make an acquaintance of the Africa of our dream through a directed reading. Reading is an expository exercise to the past for a critical evaluation of the present necessary for an accurate projection of the future. Consequently, on the 11th of January, 2019, Emerging Leaders rose to evaluate the terms of this document; how far we have or have not gone, the reason thus behind, and if possible, the trajectory for sustained acceleration.

The directed reading program is the initiative of the Centre to assist Emerging Leaders build an intellectual repository for effective policy making and regional government piloting. The goal is to expose to them, while still young, the modus operandi of government and the effective means of leadership influence and impact. Other documents reviewed include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Nigerian Constitution, The Journey Beyond the Horizon, etc. At the moment, Agenda 2063 is under review and African youths are asking: Aside political leadership, what other forces are working against National Integration? What could you suggest as a better monitoring and evaluation mechanism?

UJA, JOY C. (EAL)

Editor-In-Chief